Friday, May 6, 2016

ROMAN CHICKEN

This is one of our favorite meals. It’s a perfect weeknight dinner and also great for serving to guests. I divided the recipe in half to serve just the two of us. Have all of your ingredients cut up and set aside on a platter or cutting board ready to add to the skillet. If you can't find chicken tenders, cut up boneless, skinless chicken breast halves into smaller pieces. The addition of olives and lots of fresh herbs captures the taste of sunny Italy!


1 lb (500 g) chicken tenders or boneless chicken breasts, cut into strips
½ cup (125 ml) all-purpose flour
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup (60 ml) extra-light olive oil or grape seed oil, divided
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 orange bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 onion, cut in half and sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup (125 ml) dry vermouth or white wine
½ cup (125 ml) pitted or stuffed green olives, cut in half
½ cup (125 ml) pitted Italian black olives, cut in half
2 T (30 ml) capers
¼ cup (60 ml) chopped fresh Italian parsley
2 T (30 ml) chopped fresh oregano
2 T (30 ml) chopped fresh basil
1 T (15 ml) chopped fresh rosemary
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Pour flour into a bowl and season with salt and pepper.
Dredge chicken in flour, shake off excess and set aside.
In a large skillet, heat half of the oil over medium-high heat.
Add the chicken in two batches and cook until golden brown, about 4 to 5 minutes on each side. Set aside on a platter.

Add the rest of the oil and cook the bell peppers and onions for about 5 minutes, stirring often.
Add the garlic and cook another minute.
Add the wine and cook for a minute, while stirring with a wooden spoon.

Return the chicken to the skillet with the peppers and onions, stir and cook about 3 minutes.
Lower heat and add the olives, capers, herbs, and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine.

Transfer to 4 plates or one large platter and drizzle with a little extra-virgin olive oil. 

Serve with roasted potatoes or orzo and a bottle of Frascati, known as "gold wine" by the Romans.


No comments:

Post a Comment